Meet the Ponies

Smartie, Poppy, Zara and Blackberry live at Oak Farm with their friend – Silvi, my own horse – who is 15 hands high and was born in 2000.  The ponies have their own stables but also spend time in the fields eating grass, although we have to restrict their grazing in the summer for their own good!

All our ponies are fully vaccinated; they all have regular visits from the farrier, from the Equine Dental Technician and from the Equine Osteopath, as well as having regular worm counts taken.  This is all to ensure that they are are fit, well and happy!

WE DO NOT FEED ANY OF OUR HORSES AND PONIES BY HAND BUT YOU ARE WELCOME TO BRING THEM TREATS (CARROTS AND APPLES ARE THEIR FAVOURITE) WHICH WE WILL FEED TO THEM ON THE FLOOR

SMARTIE

SMARTIE, whose passport name is Baronhill Cochise, is a Shetland pony, born in 2000 and 38″ high.  He is brown, black and white, but mostly brown, with four white stockings.  He is a sturdy little pony and ideal for children aged from approx 1-5 years but mostly used for the smaller children who are still being led.

Smartie is very kind and gentle, has lived with us since November 2010 and loves people and particularly children.  Smartie loves being groomed, ridden and playing hide and seek!  One of his most favourite activities is being bathed and then having a good roll afterwards.

At Christmas, Smartie often puts on his donkey costume and takes part in Nativity plays, carrying Mary and sometimes Joseph.  He has done this at a local nursery school and in a local church.  He is very happy to stand during the whole performance and listen to the children singing.

The Shetland pony is a native breed originating in the Shetland Isles and dating back to the Bronze Age.  Shetland ponies range in height from 28″-44″.  They are a very strong breed of pony, capable of carrying adults, and are used for riding, driving and pack purposes.  They are also famous for taking part in the Shetland Grand National races which can be seen at Olympia and other similar events.

POPPY

POPPY, whose passport name is Plum, is a Welsh Mountain Pony (Section A) , born in 1999 and 11.1 hands high.  She is bay in colour with four white socks and a white blaze on her face.  We use her for children who have outgrown Smartie in either size or ability and who want to progress to riding off the lead.

Poppy came to live with us in July 2013 and had previously belonged to a little girl for four years.  She is a kind and gentle pony and loves children.

The Welsh Mountain Pony was originally bred in the mountains and wild regions of Wales and although often very beautiful, they are very intelligent, very hardy and have a wonderful temperament.  They can be seen ridden and driven all over the world.  They should not exceed 12.0 hands in height.

ZARA

ZARA, whose passport name is Littlehaven Zara, is a Welsh Mountain Pony (Section A), born in 2002 and 11.0 hands high.  She is dun in colour with two white socks and a white stripe on her face.

Zara came to live with us in April 2016 and is a charming but opinionated little pony!  Zara is happy being led or ridden off the lead.

The Welsh Mountain Pony was originally bred in the mountains and wild regions of Wales and although often very beautiful, they are very intelligent, very hardy and have a wonderful temperament.  They can be seen ridden and driven all over the world.  They should not exceed 12.0 hands in height.

BLACKBERRY

BLACKBERRY, whose passport name is Blaencila Arbennig (I can’t pronounce it either), is a Welsh Pony (Section C), born in 2006 and 12.2 hands high.  She is black with three white socks and a white blaze.

Blackberry came to live with us in September 2015 and previously had belonged to a boy who had outgrown her.  She is a kind and gentle pony who loves children.  We use her for the taller children who have maybe grown too big for the smaller ponies.

The Welsh Pony of Cob Type, Section C, is the stronger counterpart of the Welsh Pony, but with Cob blood.  Active, surefooted and hardy, they are ideal for so many purposes both for adults and children.  Like all the Welsh Breeds they are natural jumpers and they also excel in harness — there are in fact few things that they cannot be used for.  They should not exceed 13.2 hands in height.

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